Tag Archives: education

Community Focus on Affordable Housing for ’17Days’

From Sept. 19 through Oct. 5, artwork created by youth living in assisted housing provided by the State Representative Alma Adams with GHA youth at HA eventGreensboro Housing Authority (NC) was featured at the 17Days Arts and Culture Festival in celebration of Housing America Month. Artists in grades K-12 created art that expressed what home means to them.

“We are delighted to have our ‘What Homes Means to Me’ posters included in the 17DAYS Arts & Culture Festival,” said Tina Akers Brown, president and CEO of GHA. “This is the first time that an agency such as ours has had the opportunity to participate in the community event.  It will be great exposure for the children and will help highlight the many positive things that happen in our communities.”

03_72dpi_Harmonee_FebIncluded in the exhibit was Greensboro’s national winning 2015 ‘What Home Means to Me’ contest entry created by 18 year old, Harmonee.

Greensboro (NC) Mayor Announces 2015 What Home Means to Me National WinnerArtsGreensboro’s annual festival celebrates “all things beautiful and exciting.” In 2013, more than 85,000 people attended the festival including State Representative Alma Adams. This year, Greensboro Mayor Nancy B. Vaughan joined GHA at the 17Days Arts and Culture Festival to highlight not only wonderful work of the children, but the integral role affordable housing plays in education and job training and development.

Colorado NAHRO Names Rep. Perlmutter Legislator of the Year

On Monday, Oct. 6, Colorado NAHRO (CoNAHRO) honored Rep. Ed Perlmutter (D-Colo.) as its 2014 Legislator of the Year.

A member of the House Financial Services Committee, Perlmutter has a proven track record of fighting for the interests of Colorado residents by supporting the activities and programs of housing authorities and community development agencies. In 2013, he sponsored the Freddie Mac REMIC Reform Act, more commonly known as H.R. 3754. In the same year, he introduced an amendment to the 2014 Energy and Water spending bill in an effort to restore resources in energy efficiency and renewable energy projects. He is also committed to making transportation accessible by all.

“Rep. Perlmutter worked to help secure a “Sustainable Community Initiative” grant worth $4.5 million for DRCOG to develop the Metro Denver region’s long-range plan for growth and development, while addressing one of our region’s most pressing and exciting challenges: leveraging the multi-billion dollar expansion of the FasTracks transit system,” said Tami Fischer, president of CoNAHRO. “Part of this plan is to ensure families have affordable housing along transportation lines such as the Westline and Northline.”

Perlmutter worked side by side with CoNAHRO to endorse regulatory reform in a time of declining federal resources, in order to enable housing authority and community development agencies to more efficiently and effectively meet the growing demands of Colorado residents.

During his remarks, Perlmutter explained that his role in this process had been insignificant compared to the work of the housing and community development (HCD) professionals of Colorado. “This is a team effort,” he said. “It’s about a vision and an effort to make that vision a reality.”

The ceremony honoring the Congressman took place at the Lamar Station Affordable Housing Development in Lakewood, Colo., in front of more than 50 HCD industry leaders.

The True Cost of Not Providing Affordable Housing

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What happens when a family can’t find affordable housing? Sandra J. Newman, director of the John’s Hopkins Institute for Policy Studies, recently conducted a study (published in the Journal of Housing Economics) to determine the “impacts of affordable housing on the well-being of children.”  In the study, Newman posits that a family should spend roughly 30 percent of their income on housing–no more, but also no less. This ratio is much more difficult to keep for low-income families. Last year, the International Business Times released a report detailing the expenditures of low-income, average, and wealthy American households. Their report finds that the average income for a low-income family in 2013 was $17,563 and that they spent roughly $10,000 of that income on housing. For every dollar a low-income family spent on housing in 2013, they only spent $0.03 on education.

Lack of affordable housing options for families creates other, less obvious costs. When families are forced to spend more on housing and necessities such as food and transportation, educational expenses – for field trips, books, computers and other learning aids — are no longer affordable. Newman believes that providing such educational opportunities is essential to cognitive development.  Newman’s research showed that when families transitioned to spending 30 percent of their income on housing, they spent $98 more on the enrichment of their children.

But lowering cost burdens isn’t enough. Affordable rental housing also needs be built in safe, decent and healthy neighborhoods. In an interview with John’s Hopkins University, Newman said, “the markedly poorer performance of children in families with extremely low housing cost burdens undercuts the housing policy assumption that a lower housing cost burden is always best. Rather than finding a bargain in a good neighborhood, they’re living in low-quality housing with spillover effects on their children’s development.”

These studies underline the importance of providing decent, safe, affordable rental housing to all, and what is at stake when we fail to do so. The burden placed on low-income families should never be reflected in the development of their children; having a roof over your head should never come at the cost of a child’s education.

By: Gabby Richards, NAHRO Public Affairs Intern